To video or not to video?

To video or not to video?

Here, on the third day of the #12DaysofGreat Content, we’ll take a quick look at the role video can (SHOULD) play in your content strategy.

A good content strategy should enlist a wide variety of tactics and techniques. And one of them, without doubt, should be video.

When HubSpot asked consumers what type of content they’d like to see more of, the top choice was video. In fact, a majority of those surveyed said they wanted to see more video. It’s not often we hear consumers asking for MORE of anything from brands or advertisers. So it’s important to listen.

There are as many different ways to use video as you can possibly imagine. That’s good. And bad. It can make it hard to figure out how and where to get started, and it can lead to a paralysis of choice when it comes to developing the actual content.

Should you do a branding video? An explainer video? Customer testimonials? Something with a chance to go viral, perhaps?

The answer is (wait for it) … it depends.

While video is a powerful tool, it shouldn’t be treated any differently than other messaging and content in that it should be part of a comprehensive strategy to engage and influence the consumers most likely to see the value of what you are selling/saying.

The greatest, most compelling video content is the world won’t matter if the people who need to see it don’t see it.

And that means understanding exactly to whom you should be speaking … understanding the consumer insights that guide them … and working with other professionals to develop content that gets them quickly through the 3 key stages of Awareness, Action and Advocacy.

So the answer is clear. You should definitely video … but only after you’ve done some pretty deep thinking about how it fits into your brand, media and messaging strategy.

 

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