A Misfire for Kindle

A Misfire for Kindle

I spent an atypical amount of time in front of the tube this weekend, and as a result, saw the relatively new Kindle Fire spot probably a dozen times. It’s from this campaign:

I THINK the message Amazon folks were looking to deliver was “Look at how committed we are to customer service. It’s built right in. You never have to worry about having an unanswered question! Look, aren’t we innovative?”

But the message I get is “This device is SO non-intuitive that we need to have somebody there, all the time, to answer the many questions you are DEFINITELY going to have.”

I’m positive they didn’t intend for that to be the message. But I am equally positive that I am not the only person who took that message away — particularly upon repeated viewings.

Even worse (in my opinion) is that they branded their new feature Mayday. Which suggests not only will you have a question … you will have a crisis.

Can you imagine an iPad message that conveyed anything other than it’s really intuitive and you can enjoy it right out of box? Probably not — because that’s the only message Apple puts out there. Certainly Amazon wants to differentiate themselves from Apple — but this does not seem to be a particularly effective way to do that.

When writing copy, keep in mind that readers (or listeners) will often (usually) draw a conclusion that is significantly different from the one you intended. Think about what those conclusions might be, and think about how you can pre-empt them.

Also, remember, the “Look at us!” approach can often backfire if what you want them to look can be easily misinterpreted..

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