A Misfire for Kindle

A Misfire for Kindle

I spent an atypical amount of time in front of the tube this weekend, and as a result, saw the relatively new Kindle Fire spot probably a dozen times. It’s from this campaign:

I THINK the message Amazon folks were looking to deliver was “Look at how committed we are to customer service. It’s built right in. You never have to worry about having an unanswered question! Look, aren’t we innovative?”

But the message I get is “This device is SO non-intuitive that we need to have somebody there, all the time, to answer the many questions you are DEFINITELY going to have.”

I’m positive they didn’t intend for that to be the message. But I am equally positive that I am not the only person who took that message away — particularly upon repeated viewings.

Even worse (in my opinion) is that they branded their new feature Mayday. Which suggests not only will you have a question … you will have a crisis.

Can you imagine an iPad message that conveyed anything other than it’s really intuitive and you can enjoy it right out of box? Probably not — because that’s the only message Apple puts out there. Certainly Amazon wants to differentiate themselves from Apple — but this does not seem to be a particularly effective way to do that.

When writing copy, keep in mind that readers (or listeners) will often (usually) draw a conclusion that is significantly different from the one you intended. Think about what those conclusions might be, and think about how you can pre-empt them.

Also, remember, the “Look at us!” approach can often backfire if what you want them to look can be easily misinterpreted..

Case Studies

AdWatch: Apple, Maya Angelou and The Human Family

AdWatch: Apple, Maya Angelou and The Human Family

What do you say when you are a global brand? What do you say when your products are practically ubiquitous … shorthand for an entire class of technology? What do you’ve when your champions and critics have said nearly everything that could be said? You let a poet speak. You let a poet speak not…+

Case Study: 35% Response Rate

Case Study: 35% Response Rate

How do you get a 35% response rate on direct mail? (How about 40%?) I was showing some of my past work to a prospective client the other day, and I happened to pull out a dimensional mailing we did years ago for Nordstrom … the one that got nearly 40% response when it was…+

More from the Blog

Looking for a Winning Strategy? Try the Constanza Method.

Looking for a Winning Strategy? Try the Constanza Method.

You, me, and everyone we know have gotten to where we are today by leaning on a few tried and true techniques … approaches … strategies. Call them your go-to moves. Or your core competencies (if you are in that kind of TPS-Report-kind-of-organization.) Our brains are hard-wired to repeat what has been successful in the…+

Cowardly …

Cowardly …

If you live in the South, you may be familiar with the Food Lion supermarket chain. Food Lion is the kind of supermarket you go to because … well, because it’s the closest, I guess? Well, as many re-marketers do from time to time, seems the folks at Food Lion decided they needed a brand…+